Three Tips for the Nervous Public Speaker

Do you remember your first days without the training wheels on your bike? Were you nervous? Were you even a little bit afraid? Did that fear make you hyper-focused? Was there someone holding on to your bike’s seat, guiding you and cheering you on?

When it comes to public speaking, do you find yourself nervous and maybe even afraid? Like that first experience on your bike, let me hold on the seat and help you learn.

1. Let Your Nerves Work for You

I am probably right when I say those few moments of being on a bicycle without training wheels were some of the most focused moments in your life. All your senses were ready to learn. Your nerves, in that case, were working for you.

Nerves are not the enemy. I have been presenting public speaking courses for over two decades and I have never found a good speaker who was not nervous about their work. Notice that I wrote “a good speaker.” There are plenty of cocky and arrogant public speakers who are “never nervous” but they present without energy or enthusiasm.

What good are nerves and nervousness for the public speaker? Your nerves keep your energy level high and your focus sharp. Speaking with high energy while focused on your presentation benefits your audience. They are getting a speaker who is truly present to the subject they are presenting instead of someone who is spewing out just another average speech. Before going onstage, accept your nerves as part of being human, take several slow deep breaths, smile big and step onto the stage with energy and enthusiasm.

2. Remember: Your Audience Wants You to Succeed.

When you were riding without the training wheels, were your family or friends standing on the sidewalk hoping you would fall off and hurt yourself? Of course they were not hoping that you would fail.

In public speaking, your audience wants to you to be at your best. They do not want you to be boring as that means they will be bored. Your audience wants to see you having fun or deeply in touch with your subject. In the old days, people were told to imagine the audience in their underwear. That was just horrible advice. Your audience is on your side and you are in partnership with them. Remember, you are the expert and you are giving them a valuable presentation. They want to walk out of the building saying, “Wow. I can really use what that speaker was talking about.”

3. Good Coaching and Training is Invaluable.

When you were a small child, you did not just hop on to your bicycle and hurry down the street. No, you started with training wheels. Then, someone took off those training wheels and ran behind you, holding on to the seat, while you wobbled down the road. Several falls later, more running and wobbling, and then, whoosh you took off down the road.

Coaching and training for public speaking are invaluable ways to get to the whoosh moments of public speaking. We who coach and train public speaking skills are always getting letters of thanks from our clients who successfully used simple techniques taught in public speaking workshops or private coaching. Seek out the experts who can take you to the next level. You will discover that it is an incredible experience to have a speaking coach who can point out areas where you need to improve and support you in your natural skills as a presenter.

Learn to focus your nervous energy to achieve excellence as a speaker.

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Sean Buvala is the executive director of Storyteller.net. He’s the author of “How to Write an About Me” available at writeanaboutme.com. To learn more about public speaking, please visit the the MoreThanSpeaking website today.

Four Reasons for Public Speaking

From the days of the earliest storytellers, people have spoken to each other to convey common human experiences. Sharing these experiences brings together people from many different lifestyles and helps them to connect.

Every day, you are on the receiving end of public speaking. For the most part, you might not even be aware that someone is “doing” public speaking. The best speakers and presenters speak in a natural way that invites you to make some change in your life, no matter how small. There are four essential purposes of public speaking, listed below in random order:

1. To Entertain.
It seems that the best public speakers these days tend to be the comedians and storytellers who can make us laugh or touch our emotions. If you have good storytelling techniques, you can command the attention of any audience. As a public speaker, you can lift the spirits of your listeners through an entertaining presentation and still any of the items listed below as well.

2. To Educate.
A well-prepared public speaker can help anyone of any age learn new ideas, concepts and skills. In formal settings such as schools, a good speaker moves students beyond “Do I hafta learn this?” to “I can’t believe I learned so much!” Outside of learning institutions, there are many places for anyone to give great educational speeches such as community organizations and health-care institutions. Smart people of any age always want to learn and there is a place for you to teach with public speaking.

3. To Convince.
If you want someone to change his or her mind about a subject, then public speaking is the key to that change. While the Internet has brought us many ways to be in touch, the well-told story from an authentic speaker is still King in communication.

4. To Inspire.
While the “motivational speaker” may be a cliche that is abused on comedy shows, a person who is passionate about their topic and has coupled that with effective audience-reaching speaking skills can inspire both young and old to reach for something beyond themselves.

While most public speakers try to create positive messages, it is possible to fall into a fifth reason for speaking: to manipulate. When you speak, think about your goals and reason for speaking. Are you trying to build up your community and the people in it? Or, are you attempting to build up something or someone through false stories and lies? Be wary of manipulating your audience through your speeches.

Public speaking can be fun and educational for both your audience and you. Create some good presentations today.

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Many people are nervous about public speaking, but a good coach and teacher can help you overcome that hurdle. The author, Sean Buvala, has been speaking about and training clients in the use of storytelling techniques for public speaking since 1986. Hundreds of companies and thousands of individual learners have experienced his work as a coach. He is the executive director of Storyteller.net and lives in Arizona.

For more information about Sean’s half-day workshop that teaches you to harness the power of business, nonprofit and corporate storytelling, please visit our website at http://seantells.com/morethanspeaking.

Turn Over the Stones You Know

Validation. The stones here are more valuable than the stones there.

black and white picutre of sean buvala with the the title of the storytelling podcast in blueThere are folktales that tell about how a tradesman had a dream of a great fortune, there under a large stone in a far-away city. Discontent with his own life, he set out, in disguise, to find this fortune there. On his way there, he encountered a city guard and the disguised tradesman shared his secret dream with him. The guard mocked him, saying he himself had a dream of a great fortune under the hearthstones at the home of a tradesman in a city far away. The city the guard described was the tradesman’s city.

Undaunted, the tradesman still sought out the stone there in that foreign place. When the tradesman finally found the stone there in the far away, there was nothing underneath it.

Returning home sad and dejected, he remembered the mocking of the guard. Thinking it futile, he went to his own hearth and moved aside the flagstones. Here in his own shop he discovered a huge fortune in gold had been with him all along.

In decades of storytelling and coaching, all I can say is this: the fortune you seek (as you define it) is where you are now: here. Waiting to get on the perfect stage, festival or conference won’t fix your career. Getting published in the right magazine won’t bring the throngs to your door. Being on the World’s Largest Afternoon Talk Show doesn’t always mean success (ask around) and that moment of success is usually fleeting. This is not just about money, either. Getting your kids in the right school, meeting with that one guru, falling in love with the right person, or buying that thing you wish to conspicuously consume is never the “there” you are seeking.

I’ve heard the stories from my shocked friends and clients who discovered the thing they finally got “there” only left them empty “here.” Some of those stories sound like:

“I was on the (BigGiantWherever) stage and it made no difference in my career.”
“I published my book and I still don’t have any new bookings!”
Old School: “I bought 1000 of my new CDs and 900 are still in storage in my garage.”

“Getting There” isn’t one thing, it’s many. And, in forewarning: if someone from one of those “getting there” places says they have the one thing you need, they are in it for your money or your body or your freedom.

You will get “there” when you finally learn to turn over the stones in your own “here.” The constant turning of stones, in many small acts, stages, coaches, and events will get you to the “here” you want.

Success and contentment take time. You are as valuable here as you are there.

The true treasure is under your own stones.

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I am going back and listening to decades of recordings of my own storytelling. Every month or so I will pop one up on my new podcast “Hear Sean Tell Stories.” Go to hearsean.com to figure out where to hear it at. Thanks.

Hear Sean

I’ll list all my podcasts here. Subscribe to the ones that interest you. Thanks.

lion out of cut paperStory On Saturday
Short, small tales with a brief commentary. Under 5 minutes. Adults and teens.
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black and white picture of sean buvala with the the title of the storytelling podcast in blueHear Sean Tell Stories
An experiment in looking back at recordings from my 30 years of oral storytelling. Stories are mostly for adults and teens. These are not for kids. Live and studio recordings. I’ll share some tellings I really loved and probably some that didn’t work. Those might be the teachable moment, if you will. These will probably go out every month or more often, depending on my schedule.
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