Turn Over the Stones You Know

Validation. The stones here are more valuable than the stones there.

black and white picutre of sean buvala with the the title of the storytelling podcast in blueThere are folktales that tell about how a tradesman had a dream of a great fortune, there under a large stone in a far-away city. Discontent with his own life, he set out, in disguise, to find this fortune there. On his way there, he encountered a city guard and the disguised tradesman shared his secret dream with him. The guard mocked him, saying he himself had a dream of a great fortune under the hearthstones at the home of a tradesman in a city far away. The city the guard described was the tradesman’s city.

Undaunted, the tradesman still sought out the stone there in that foreign place. When the tradesman finally found the stone there in the far away, there was nothing underneath it.

Returning home sad and dejected, he remembered the mocking of the guard. Thinking it futile, he went to his own hearth and moved aside the flagstones. Here in his own shop he discovered a huge fortune in gold had been with him all along.

In decades of storytelling and coaching, all I can say is this: the fortune you seek (as you define it) is where you are now: here. Waiting to get on the perfect stage, festival or conference won’t fix your career. Getting published in the right magazine won’t bring the throngs to your door. Being on the World’s Largest Afternoon Talk Show doesn’t always mean success (ask around) and that moment of success is usually fleeting. This is not just about money, either. Getting your kids in the right school, meeting with that one guru, falling in love with the right person, or buying that thing you wish to conspicuously consume is never the “there” you are seeking.

I’ve heard the stories from my shocked friends and clients who discovered the thing they finally got “there” only left them empty “here.” Some of those stories sound like:

“I was on the (BigGiantWherever) stage and it made no difference in my career.”
“I published my book and I still don’t have any new bookings!”
Old School: “I bought 1000 of my new CDs and 900 are still in storage in my garage.”

“Getting There” isn’t one thing, it’s many. And, in forewarning: if someone from one of those “getting there” places says they have the one thing you need, they are in it for your money or your body or your freedom.

You will get “there” when you finally learn to turn over the stones in your own “here.” The constant turning of stones, in many small acts, stages, coaches, and events will get you to the “here” you want.

Success and contentment take time. You are as valuable here as you are there.

The true treasure is under your own stones.

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I am going back and listening to decades of recordings of my own storytelling. Every month or so I will pop one up on my new podcast “Hear Sean Tell Stories.” Go to hearsean.com to figure out where to hear it at. Thanks.

Hear Sean

I’ll list all my podcasts here. Subscribe to the ones that interest you. Thanks.

lion out of cut paperStory On Saturday
Short, small tales with a brief commentary. Under 5 minutes. Adults and teens.
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black and white picture of sean buvala with the the title of the storytelling podcast in blueHear Sean Tell Stories
An experiment in looking back at recordings from my 30 years of oral storytelling. Stories are mostly for adults and teens. These are not for kids. Live and studio recordings. I’ll share some tellings I really loved and probably some that didn’t work. Those might be the teachable moment, if you will. These will probably go out every month or more often, depending on my schedule.
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“Story on Saturday” Podcast

I’ve created a new weekly podcast for you, full of short stories. We’re basing it out of Anchor.fm, but we’ll add the stream here. Latest Update: Week 7 for September 23, 2017.

You can also subscribe on GOOGLE. Click this link to go to the podcast page there.

Get it on Itunes or Apple Podcast.

 

Week 1: “Lion and Hare and a Well.” The fable is a traditional Aesop tale. I’ve shortened it a bit from previous tellings. Do the powerful have the right to oppress? Let’s let the victims become the victors. Launching a new and faster podcast over on Anchor for as long as I can keep up with it. 4:15 second listen.

Week 2: “The Hare and His Ears” by Aesop. The powerful should ban those who are different? Maybe everyone will leave. 3:16 run time.

Week 3: “The Miser and His Gold” by Aesop. Go ahead, collect wealth only to stare at it. Or maybe not. 3:30 Run Time.

Week 4: “The Lion’s Share” by Aesop. When the powerful hunt with the lesser, who do you think gets the the spoils?

Week 5: “The Fox and the Hedgehog.” Who has the most tricks? Who has the one best trick? An Aesopian Grimm tale by way of Romania or the like.

Week 6: “The Lion and His Bad Breath.” Does power require good news, delivered twice a day? The questions of speaking truth-to-power is an old theme. Also known as ” The Lion and his Councilors.”

Week 7: “The Eagle at the Concert.” It’s hard to speak truth to power; that is why so few can do it. An Aesop-influenced fable.

Do You Want A Podcast Sometimes Darker, Harder, Off-Kilter? Try:
watercolor rave head with the words of the podcast on it

Credits:
Art work on the yellow lion is from The Mesquite Tree Studio in Arizona.

The good British voiceover on Episodes 3 and later come from SuperWiseMon.

Music credit: “Baba Yaga” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/